What do Mark Twain, George Bernard Shaw, George Orwell, Miguel De Cervantes, and Shakespeare have in common? All were censored by the PA online.

Here is a partial list of quotes that were removed by the PA Online moderators.

  • “The truth may be stretched thin, but it never breaks, and it always surfaces above lies, as oil floats on water.”  Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote
  • “The less there is to justify a traditional custom, the harder it is to get rid of it”  –  Mark Twain
  • “All censorships exist to prevent anyone from challenging current conceptions and existing institutions. All progress is initiated by challenging current conceptions, and executed by supplanting existing institutions. Consequently, the first condition of progress is the removal of censorship.” George Bernard Shaw
  • “Journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed: everything else is public relations.” George Orwell
  • ”… The sinister fact about literary censorship in England is that it is largely voluntary.  Unpopular ideas can be silenced, and inconvenient facts kept dark, without the need for any official ban. Anyone who has lived long in a foreign country will know of instances of sensational items of news — things which on their own merits would get the big headlines-being kept right out of the British press, not because the Government intervened but because of a general tacit agreement that ‘it wouldn’t do’ to mention that particular fact. So far as the daily newspapers go, this is easy to understand. The British press is extremely centralised, and most of it is owned by wealthy men who have every motive to be dishonest on certain important topics. But the same kind of veiled censorship also operates in books and periodicals, as well as in plays, films and radio. At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed that all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to say this, that or the other, but it is ‘not done’ to say it, just as in mid-Victorian times it was ‘not done’ to mention trousers in the presence of a lady.      Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with surprising effectiveness. …”George Orwell

 

And a misquoted Shakespeare which was removed quite a few times….

“Methinks thou doth protest too much.”

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